Are you on edge when wine shopping? Is the only thing you know about wine is that is comes in red and white? If you’re lost when picking wine, you need to expand your wine knowledge. Continue reading to learn what you need to know about getting the right wine.
The temperature of your wine will give it peak flavor. Red wines are best served at 60°F. Begin by having wine at about 58 degrees and letting it warm up in a glass. White wines are best at about 47 degrees. If it is served warmer, it may result in a dull tasting wine.
Don’t be scared of labels containing sulfite warnings. There are sulfites in all wines, but distributors in America are the only ones required to put it on the labels. While sulfites have been known to cause certain allergic reactions in rare cases, you shouldn’t worry if you haven’t noticed anything before.
Keep reds and whites in their respective glasses. Whites need a more fragile glass, while red wine can be served in normal wine glasses. Red wine likes air and a wide glass. This allows lots of air into the glass and lets the wine warm, and awakens the flavors as it interacts with the air. 
You should know how to take the label off of a wine bottle carefully by peeling. The best way to do this is putting your bottle into the oven. After a few minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit, take out the bottle with oven mitts and delicately peel off the label, starting at the corner.
If a lighter wine is what your searching for, don’t only look to one color. Red wines and white wines have equal amounts of alcohol. Whites are lighter in taste, though. Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon Blanc are lightest; these may be best as table wines.
If you are serving your wine, you need to have good wine glasses. It’s important that you use classy glassware that is spotless, because this will help elevate the wine in the eyes of your guests. Chipped or ugly glasses should be ditched in favor of new glasses.
Many varieties of wine will go well with your favorite dessert. Dessert wines are typically sweeter than wines served with your meal. Ruby and tawny ports are just two varieties that provide an authentic sweetness which works well with desserts. Keep them at 55 degrees to get the optimal flavor.
A common misconception about the term “vintage” is that it refers to when the actual wine was made. The truth is that the term refers to the year the grapes were harvested. So, a 2010 wine has been made with grapes harvested in the fall of 2010. Then the process continues until they are bottled. They won’t show up in stores for a year or two after that.
Now that you’ve gone through this article, enjoying wine should be a lot easier. Bring a copy of this article to the wine store for your next visit. That way, you can look at it anytime you are staring at rows and rows of wine. By using this advice, you’ll be able to get the best bottle of wine for you.

Advertisements